Bible Study Day 9: Confession

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Leviticus 23 – Numbers 9

Honestly, there isn’t much to say about these chapters. If you think the book of Leviticus is repetitive and lengthy, meet its cousin Numbers. I don’t have much to say about today’s passage. So far in Numbers God has asked Moses to take a census of the Hebrew population. Along with the census, He made specific rules against behavior and for restitution, and regulations concerning the ‘unclean.’ I do not envy those who have to memorize Leviticus and Numbers; it can’t be an enjoyable experience. Although I have to imagine it might be easy because the writing is very repetitive you only have to memorize particular distinctions. Who knows, I don’t plan on memorizing these books any time soon.

As I wrapped up Leviticus, I noticed something that is a theme throughout the New Testament that I probably didn’t give much thought to outside of it just being some duty, but it’s the idea of confession. At the end of Leviticus God talks about His punishments for disobedience and how if the people confess their sins, “I will remember my covenant with Jacob;  and I will remember also my covenant with Isaac and also my covenant with Abraham, and I will remember the land.” When we talk about salvation most of the conversation revolves around God’s grace, as it well should, however not enough is spoken about the actions that stem from God’s grace which are confession and repentance.

Often it’s chimed that works alone cannot save you only the grace of God and that’s true, but only one blade of the scissors is being mentioned. Merely acknowledging a bridge’s existence does not get you across. If you think acknowledging God’s grace at the end of a drunken stupor is what it means to be saved, then you’re Sunday preacher either lied to you or misled you. Perhaps I’m a cynic (not perhaps I definitely am), but merely chanting a few words that are written on the back of a pamphlet is not the key. “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me”, what does it mean to believe? Merely saying you believe does not mean you believe any more than saying you’re a super athlete. We believe that if we jump out of a 10th-floor window, we’ll be seriously injured which is why we don’t, yet we believe in a just and loving God who sent His son to atone for our sins. Perhaps we believe, or perhaps we don’t.

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